Thursday, April 9, 2015

ACTIVATING CANNABINOID RECEPTORS

70 known Cannabinoids (8 showing)


FROM OUR PARTNERS AT NEW CURE
Edited and published by Right Reverend Gregory Karl Davis
Cannabinoid therapy appears to works marvelously for some, and yet others fail to respond.
Whilst it is critical to consider cannabinoid content as a factor in this (i.e. – Is there enough Cannabidiol (CBD) in your extract? Etc. Another mitigating detail lies within if ones cannabinoid receptors are activated or not.
Methylation has been proven to deactivate CB receptors, and this appears particularly prevalent within cancers of the stomach, colon1 and breast. If methylation can create such an unwanted and critical scenario during cannabinoid therapy, then those undergoing cannabinoid therapy should look to include demethylating2 agents into their regime.
These include; Green Tea, FeverFew and Annurca Apples3 Green Tea is particularly useful as it can also naturally create Anti-Angiogenesis4
Another area that should be explored is within the use of Phenolic Oils.
Phenols and Phenylpropanoids are compounds of carbon-ring molecules incorporating on isoprene unit. They are sometimes called hemiterpenes. There are dozens of varieties of phenylpropanoids. They are found in Clove (90%), Cassia (80%), Basil (75%), Cinnamon (73%), Oregano (60%), Anise (50%), and Peppermint (25%).
While they can create conditions where unfriendly viruses and bacteria cannot live, the most important function performed by phenylpropanoids is that they clean the receptor sites on the cells. Without clean receptor sites cells cannot communicate, and the body malfunctions, resulting in sickness.
David Stewart, PhD, DNM also suggests in his book 'The Chemistry of Essential Oils Made Simple’ – that phenolic oils can clean receptor sites.
Prof. Dr. Jürg Gertsch of the Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Switzerland conducted a brilliant research paper5 looking for Phytocannabinoids beyond cannabis.
Prof Jürg Gertsch was kind enough to suggest the essential oil of Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm) due to its terpenoid content, as a way to activate CB receptors, based on some preliminary research he has conducted.
In, 'Turned-Off Cannabinoid Receptor Turns on Colorectal Tumor Growth' published on www.drugs.com
6. HOUSTON, Aug. 1, 2008 – New preclinical research shows that cannabinoid cell surface receptor CB1 plays a tumor-suppressing role in human colorectalcancer, scientists report in the Aug. 1 edition of the journal Cancer Research. CB1 is well-established for relieving pain and nausea, elevating mood and stimulating appetite by serving as a docking station for the cannabinoid group of signaling molecules. It now may serve as a new path for cancer prevention or treatment.
“We’ve found that CB1 expression is lost in most colorectal cancers, and when that happens a cancer-promoting protein is free to inhibit cell death,” said senior author Raymond DuBois, M.D., Ph.D., provost and executive vice president of The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. DuBois and collaborators from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center also show that CB1 expression can be restored with an existing drug, decitabine. They found that mice prone to developing intestinal tumors that also have functioning CB1 receptors develop fewer and smaller tumors when treated with a drug that mimics a cannabinoid receptor ligand. Ligands are molecules that function by binding to specific receptors. Agonists are synthetic molecules that mimic the action of a natural molecule.
“Potential application of cannabinoids as anti-tumor drugs is an exciting prospect, because cannabinoid agonists are being evaluated now to treat the side-effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy,” DuBois said. “Turning CB1 back on and then treating with a cannabinoid agonist could provide a new approach to colorectal cancer treatment or prevention.”

In study entitled, "Loss of cannabinoid receptor 1 accelerates intestinal tumor growth," concluded, "In conclusion, our studies reveal the molecular mechanism by which cannabinoids inhibit tumor growth. We found that aberrant methylation of CB1 represents a clear mechanism for loss of expression in CRC. Using multiple approaches, we provide in vivo evidence demonstrating that endocannabinoid signaling via CB1 plays a key role in regulating intestinal tumor growth. Importantly, we elucidated the signaling pathway that mediates the pro-apoptotic effects of CB1. Moreover, our results may provide a rationale for the development of CB1 agonists that do not cross the blood-brain barrier for cancer prevention or treatment in combination with a demethylating agent.
Cannabinoids are a group of ligands that serve a variety of cell-signaling roles. Some are produced by the body internally (endocannabinoids). External cannabinoids include manmade versions and those present in plants, most famously the active ingredient in marijuana (THC).
Receptor shutdown by methylation
Endocannabinoid signaling is important to the normal functioning of the digestive system and has been shown to protect the colon against inflammation. Since chronic inflammation is a known risk factor for colorectal cancer, the researchers decided to look into the role of cannabinoid receptors in a mouse model of colon cancer.
“People have looked at cannabinoids in cancer earlier, mainly in cell culture experiments,” DuBois said. “The molecular mechanisms for loss of the receptor and its effect on cancer have not been previously shown.”
First, the team found that CB1 was largely absent in 18 of 19 human tumor specimens and in 9 of 10 colorectal cancer cell lines. Further experimentation showed that the gene that encodes the CB1 protein was not damaged, but shut down chemically by the attachment of methyl groups – a carbon atom surrounded by three hydrogen atoms – to the gene encoding CB1.

Nadine Bews regimen calls for 1/8 teaspoon of grocery store cinnamon (cinnamon cassia) taken daily with 1 oz minimum coca chocolate 90% butter, per 1 gram cannabis indica extract at night  for colon, stomach, breast cancers. Also, her regimen calls for 1-2 qt. Soda water with cranberry extract added to aid kidney function to move fluids. Another practioner suggests adding as much lemon juice as tolerable for aid in handling THC side effects.
To quote from a medical research paper here: here we find that the CB1 cannabinoid receptor is also effected by curcumin -The dietary polyphenols trans-resveratrol and curcumin selectively bind human CB1 cannabinoid receptors with nanomolar affinities and function as antagonists/inverse agonists. We really cannot comprehend this report but have added for fellow researchers to determine the significance. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19359525


Be well and at peace ~ Holly

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